Blog Archives

A Day In My Life

Yesterday, I recorded what I could about how diabetes plays into my day. Yesterday was not like every single day ever, but it also was not unique, I’ve had a lot of days like this.

7:00am – I wake up and test my blood sugar. 179. Too high. I bolus 1.10 units of insulin. My fasting has been great for weeks, I wonder if I might be getting sick or if last nights low is to blame.

7:15am – while showering, Dexcom alerts to a high. Brad tells me it’s reading 182 and clears it for me when I let him know I’ve already taken a correction.

7:30am – I realize I’ve left my test strip in my meter. I check my feet while applying lotion and select blue clothing since it’s Type 1 Day.

Whoops!

7:55am – test again, in down to 158 and bolus 3.2 units for 32 grams of carbs. I have .8 of my correction still active. Grab a Glucerna and leave for work. (27g for a Glucerna and 5g for the cream I’ll put in my coffee at work)

On my drive to work, I sip on my Glucerna and it’s halfway gone when I arrive at work.

8:37am – I’m drinking my coffee and find that my Dexcom reads ???.

11:23am – I’ve been busy at work and ignored Dex and hunger. Now I’m thinking about lunch, which I’ll eat at noon. Dex figured it out again and reads 133. I hope it’s accurate. I have a brief break in my day, so I log online to pay for my insulin that arrived yesterday. Medco’s online portal is not easy to navigate and I have to search to find where to pay them!

I’m also painfully aware today that I’m between health insurance plans. Since Brad started a new job, the great health plan ended yesterday. The less-than great plan starts soon, but we hope to not have to use it until next year.

11:40am – I test my blood sugar. The finger stick really hurts. It comes in at 90. I tag it as “Pre-Meal” and bolus 1.65 units for the 20g of carbs that my little sandwich has. Dex thinks I’m 123, so I calibrate with the 90 and it settles at 110. Close enough. I won’t be eating for 20 minutes still.

Noon – I can finally eat, I put my sandwich in the toaster oven and refill my water bottle. My finger still smarts from the last check and I post my T1 Day blog. Read the rest of this entry

Looking Back… At Bruises

I’m currently painfully aware of the yucky bruise on my stomach from my Vampire Cannula over the weekend. As I keep checking to see if it finally looks any better, I keep remembering when stomach bruises were normal..

What I Call Success

October 31, 2011

As I took the needle out of my stomach, I heard my sister exclaim, “Ta Da!” as if I had just done a successful back handspring.

I hadn’t realized that anyone was watching me give myself insulin as I had stepped out of the room full of people to take my shot. Diabetes is considered an invisible illness, but for me it can be extremely visible, especially when I first started injecting insulin.

Read the rest of this entry

Fall Weekend: Pumpkins, Recipes, Vampires

I’m writing one of those rare weekend wrap up posts. I had a pretty busy fall weekend.

FRIDAY

We went over to our friends’ apartment to split a pizza. I helped my friend with her wedding invitations and our guys played Call of Duty. Nothing screams “Wedding!” like the sounds of fighting zombies in the background.

SATURDAY

We had lunch at my mom’s where I enjoyed chili for the the first time in my life. (Enjoyed, not ate.) My mom made her chili with black beans and unnoticeable onions, so I actually liked it.

Saturday even called for pumpkin carving. Something that I had NEVER done before! When we were kids we got to paint pumpkins and now that I’ve carved one, I can see why my parents didn’t carve pumpkins with us. They would have done most of the work! I did completely clean and carve my own pumpkin. My friend had templates, but I don’t think I was quite ready for anything complicated, so I drew a K on my pumpkin and carved away.

The expert pumpkin and the beginner, all lit up

After the carving fun, we settled in to watch a not-scary Halloween movie. We watched Dark Shadows, I found it pretty funny.

SUNDAY Read the rest of this entry

Spend Time Listening

It’s been awhile since I posted anything significant about diabetes. I still have diabetes. It still creeps into every aspect of my life, it especially horns in on my sleeping as of late.

I started writing this post then the DSMA Blog Carnival topic for October was posted as: What can diabetes educators/HCP learn from the DOC? and I thought this kind of relates, continue reading for some reflections on my last endocrinologist appointment.

Most of the time I don’t have a problem with the fact that my endo sees only adults making me one of her few Type 1 patients or that I’m treated at a teaching hospital and spend most of my appointments with doctors in training*. But at my last appointment I did.

The doctor in training that I saw seriously lacked patient communication skills. She did all of the things that people with diabetes hate. She picked out a particularly high number on my log and asked what happened. I explained to her that I had an infusion site failure, I took the proper steps to fix it and pointed out where my number stabilized (in reasonably short order). She practically disregarded my explanation and fixated on that number and how to fix it for that time of day until I stopped her and said that I did everything right to fix it and that one number didn’t represent my general diabetes status during the afternoons. Then she said, three different times, “Your A1c went up.”

“Your A1c went up.” “Your A1c is up by .2.” Yes, yes I realize that my A1c increased by .2. It’s 6.1 from a 5.9, please move on. That’s only an average glucose increase from 123 to 128. And the goal on my chart is under 7% and my personal goal is under 6.5% so I think I’m doing ok. Clearly, my doctor in training had no idea what it’s like to live with diabetes. She asked about complications (I have none), she asked about any other issues that I was having and I explained my frustration with massive after lunch spikes, which she couldn’t find on my log to be a problem and said, “We’re okay with the 160s after you eat.” That’s when I said, “but I’m not.”

I see these doctors in training for chart updates and basic reviews of my logs since my last appointment, then I see my endo and they go quiet. Hopefully she learned something when Dr. O was unfazed by my A1c jump and was attentive to my after lunch frustration (that was when she switched me to Apidra).

The two positive things that this doctor in training did were to ask me about my pump since she wasn’t familiar with OmniPod and to talk about my kidney function improvement. She answered my questions about what I could do to continue reducing my nephrology risk (continue keeping my blood sugar in range and keep doing what I’m doing with my blood pressure).

This appointment was awhile ago, and I’ve been thinking about it off and on and been bothered by the communication/customer patient service aspect of it. I know that I’m not alone in feeling frustrated when healthcare professionals don’t acknowledge the day-to-day life that affects diabetes and that things happen beyond our control. The logs that they chose to look at were all of my test results from painting and moving into our new house, a situation that is not my regular and will throw my numbers into strange patterns. Situations that need prepared for and addressed, but not treated the same way as my typical routine.

How the DOC fits in Read the rest of this entry

Friday Five: Rolling With It

This would be the diabetes edition of my Friday Five:

  1. I was sifting through trends on my PDM and was surprised that I’d gone a whole week without a hypo. An hour later, I was 51. After dinner I dropped again to 56. I should stop noticing things like that.

    I also decided that a top goal of 130 wasn’t realistic

  2. When I locked up the office yesterday, my expected test strips hadn’t arrived yet and I wasn’t thrilled that they were late. When I walked in this morning, they were waiting on my desk. The postal fairy came early today.
  3. We have a monthly meeting at work and take turns bringing breakfast. The awesome lady who brought today’s breakfast made low “diabetic-friendly carrot cake muffins,” they were delicious. I’m stealing the recipe.
  4. My cats have recently decided that my OmniPods are supposed to be stepped on when they crawl over me. Not pleasant.
  5. Last night I had a dream that I got stung by a bee. I’ve never actually been stung before so I don’t know what it feels like. I was “stung” where I had my Dexcom sensor. That I have since pulled for being wildly inaccurate (off by 100+).

    I think I preferred Dexcom’s opinion

Sometimes you just have to roll with it.

Related Posts:

Friday Five: Confessions

Friday Five: Things I don’t understand

Friday Five

Wordless Wednesday: I Sleep Like That Too!

Last night this was happening on the couch beside me:

I wondered how that was could even seem like a comfortable sleeping position until I realized that for three nights, I was sleeping like that! Between the OmniPod on my right arm and the Dexcom on my left leg, this typical side sleeper couldn’t comfortably lay how she wanted to. I’m pretty sure that I spent more of those three nights looking just as twisted as my little Watson.

On another note, I have become a crazy cat lady.

Related Posts:

Because I can’t take them all home

A letter to 4 a.m.

Battery operated

Refashioned Pink Cardigan

Only on a rare occasion will you hear me call a cardigan a “cardi” I think it sounds a bit odd. But anyway, I love cardigans.

I’m more likely to be found wearing a cardigan sweater instead of  a traditional sweater like my light pink sweater… that may or may not have been purchased in the girls’ department several years ago.

If it’s a size large in my closet… it came from the girls’ department

I liked the pinkish, peach of the sweater, the pearl details and its soft look but I didn’t really wear it very much because I’m not a fan of pulling static-inducing sweaters over my head.

I love the dainty detail

I measured and cut straight down the middle of the front. Sewed the edges and affixed a little ribbon tie. Now I have a cute little “cardi.” Read the rest of this entry

Need a little inspiration

Today is No D Day a day that I forgo discussing diabetes. So that is my final mention of that.

Click to see other bloggers observing today and link up.

Lately it seems that inspiration for many things escapes me. For instance, I have nearly 100 posts in my queue that will never make it the interwebs because they’re completely lacking in content, tone and generally inspired topics. I feel guilty when I don’t post consistently and it saddens me that so many of those drafts are venting about stupid things that none of you care about. I would like to keep this blog fresh and hopefully add some value to the internet. Read the rest of this entry

Friday Five: Confessions

This Friday Five thing might become a regular feature….

Anyway it’s time for some confessions of the week:

  1. I lost my credit card when I stopped to buy a head of lettuce at the store. I searched my purse, car and house before we reported it missing to the company. I’ll have a new card tomorrow. I found my “lost” card about an hour after the report, stuck to my driver’s license.
  2. I enjoyed a cup of coffee before my dentist appointment today (and after).
  3. I have already been plotting Christmas gifts for people, but I’m holding back because it seems so early to get them. Read the rest of this entry

Diagnosed as an Adult: An Interview with Mom

I follow some amazing parents of children with diabetes on Twitter. I read their blogs and occasionally reach out to them for advice (OmniPod arm sites for example). I’ve found myself thankful that my pancreas carried me into adulthood. But you don’t often hear how a diagnosis of diabetes as an adult impacts your parents. I decided to ask my mom if she’d be willing to be interviewed.

Here’s what she said:

What were some of your thoughts when we first found out I had diabetes?

I was worried and torn. Your Dad was in CCU in Pittsburgh, while you were in a hospital in Ohio. Thankfully God placed Brad’s family there to help you. I was concerned about what this would mean for you over the long haul. I also thought about how stressful this had to be to a newly married couple.

Do you ever wonder what it would have been like if I’d had diabetes as a child? Read the rest of this entry