Category Archives: LinkedIn

A(speed)rda

I saw my endo last week. (Okay, more accurately I saw a doctor doing an endo rotation who was stumped by some of my questions and got my real endo so I saw her too and we were wearing basically the same shoes.)

I poured out some diabetes woes to her, including the new information I was receiving from my Dexcom that bothered. The frustration of pre-bolusing 30 minutes before consuming food and waiting forever for highs to subside.

She explained that the 1-hour-post lunch spike I was seeing is something that’s common with type 1 patients, but without a CGM they often don’t know about it. (My spike is NOT the textbook 2 hours after food so 2 hour post readings don’t really mean much for spikes) She apologetically explained that there aren’t any insulins that can come close to the speed of working-pancreas insulin. But she wanted me to give Apidra a shot (no pun intended!) to see if it helped.

(no I don’t mix these)

So today, my “Aspeedra” is in my OmniPod and we’ll see how this works.

Related Posts:

Complicated

A letter to 4 a.m.

One thing to improve

Staying Professional On LinkedIn

Sometimes I raise an eyebrow at the things I see on LinkedIn. I’m talking about grammar/formatting and Twitter.

I’m not an expert but I have very specific views on how I think the network should be used. I was one of the first few in my college class to created a LinkedIn account, so my first connections were professors and professionals. I feel like that it was a good move because I got to see how the “real grown ups” did it.

Grammar/formatting

A friend and I were chatting about social networks and I was telling her about LinkedIn (she’s not currently on it) and some of the weird things I’d seen on it.

“You may think I’m really weird,” she said to me. “But sometimes I type things up in Word before putting them online to make sure I don’t look stupid.” Read the rest of this entry

How did you get here?

Where did you come from?

I’m actually not being philosophical, I’m being slightly shallow. Chances are you dropped by this blog by way of Facebook? Which means you’re more likely to comment on its content on my Facebook.

Maybe you found me through Twitter or you’re on the cutting edge and found a post on Google Plus or maybe you just “Stumbled Upon” this blog… I’m frequently entertained by the traffic drivers to my site, specifically when it comes to search terms.

Here are some of my favorite search terms:

Getting pregnant saved my life

dog dopound (spelling error included) Read the rest of this entry

I’m a case study

I really like LinkedIn and it’s always nice when LinkedIn likes me back.

I recently had a conversation with Kyle Lacy about my LinkedIn experiences… and I’m a case study. I have my current job greatly in part to being found on LinkedIn. Read more on Kyle’s blog.

It’s off to a webinar I go, so happy reading over on http://www.kylelacy.com or on these other LinkedIn posts:

LinkedIn Recommendations vs. References

I denied people on LinkedIn

 

LinkedIn Recommendations vs. References

Can a LinkedIn recommendation replace a job reference?

I’m actually hoping for some feedback on this.

I think that it would be possible. I have a few recommendations on my LinkedIn profile… it’s ok if you want to go look, the blog will be here when you get back. For those recommendations, I approached the same people that I would ask for job references and asked that they recommend my work. And they wrote what I would imagine (and hope!) they would say to someone inquiring about me for a potential position.

Typically you provide three references when asked during the application/interview process for a job. Well if I were to supply three references, I’d pick three of the people who have recommended me on LinkedIn.

Read the rest of this entry

Analysis of my social media practices

I obsess over use social media…. a lot of social media. It interests me.

We visited with a friend who made fun of Twitter, FourSquare and Google+ all in one sitting. Afterward, I decided to dissect my motives for the social media that I use.

  • Facebook: Facebook is still the king of social networks, it’s been around since high school and I use it to connect with friends and relatives with the occasional brand liking or general creeping that most users participate in. Read the rest of this entry

The Relationship between Social Networks and Smartphones

If you missed me at Scholar Day, here’s the whirlwind tour of my 3 semester-long research study.

Read the rest of this entry

I denied people on LinkedIn

I denied two people in the course of two days who wanted to connect with me via LinkedIn. I kind of felt like I committed a networking sin.

I have relatively few connections on LinkedIn, but in my defense I am a student who is still working very hard on building her network.

So why deny these connection requests? I do evaluate my connection requests when I receive them. I ask myself the following questions:

  • Do I know them?
  • How are we connected (personally, academically or professionally)?
  • Can they comment on work I’ve done?
  • Can I comment on work they’ve done?
  • Is this person a positive connection that I don’t mind potential employers viewing?

Request #1 came from a former coworker and also a graduate of Mount Union.

  • Yes, I knew her.
  • We were academically and pseudo professionally connected.
  • Yes, she can comment positively on work that I’ve done.
  • Yes, I can comment negatively on work she has done.
  • She is not a connection that I would want potentials employers to see.

I was actually quite surprised to see her request. When we worked together she never had a positive attitude about anything and her employment ended due to unethical behavior. I haven’t seen nor spoken with her since her abrupt end in employment. No matter how many nice things she could say about me, if I can’t say positive things about someone, I won’t connect with them.

Request #2 came from a very recent graduate of Mount Union.

  • Yes, I know her.
  • We only participated in Student Senate together, so we are academically connected.
  • She really can’t comment on much work I’ve done since we were on different committees.
  • I can only comment on an inconsistent communication and attendance record that she had.
  • We’re in different fields, aren’t friends and were never classmates so I don’t really think potential employers would care about the connection.

I turned this request down. Accepting it would only add one more person to the other person’s network.

I think I’m much more likely to accept a connection from someone I would be connected with professionally.

I am connected with a few people that I don’t know extremely well, but all of the answers to those questions lead me to believe it’s a positive connection.

Am I the only one who does this?